South Orange Chiropractic Center

Choose the best chiropractic wellness center in South Orange NJ, South Orange Chiropractic Center. We are committed to serving you. Visit our website.

Rated 5.0 based on 24 customer reviews
60 1st St
South Orange, NJ 07079

Open: M,W,F 9am-12pm

Open: M,W,F 3pm-7pm

Open: T 3pm-7pm

Open: T 9pm-11pm

60 1st St  |  South Orange, NJ 07079  |  973-761-0022

Articles in Category: Exercise

Pain Relief for People on Their Feet All Day

Pain Relief for People on Their Feet All Day
Published Thursday, 15 March 2018

There are so many jobs and careers which require employees to stand for 8+ hours in a row. Even those with jobs requiring standing in shorter shifts know how difficult it can be on the body to stand for so long.

Servers, bartenders, and kitchen staff are constantly on their feet moving around. Retail associates almost never have a chance to sit down. Factory workers and other people who work in manufacturing jobs can stand in the same spot for hours on end with only minutes to take a break.

These kinds of physical, manual labor can wreak havoc on people’s backs, knees, hips, ankles, and feet. Here are some ways people who work on their feet all day can combat the physical aches, pains, and injuries associated with high amounts of standing.

Tip to Reduce Pain #1: Exercise

Exercise for Back Pain Relief

As with so many other ailments, exercise is the first step in making your body feel better. Exercising to strengthen the back muscles and core muscles will help keep you standing stronger for longer without pain. Use yoga poses to ease the aches and pains associated with standing on your feet all day.

End of Day Poses:

  • Legs up the wall - Lie down on the floor next to a wall, put your feet up the wall, and straighten your legs. Start with just a few minutes, eventually working up to 20 minutes at a time.
  • Knee to chest - Lie down on your back and pull one knee at a time up to your chest. Hold here for 10-30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg.
  • Figure Four - Lie down on your back, pull your right foot over your left knee, then raise your left leg toward your chest. Hold for 10-30 seconds. Repeat with the other leg.

During the Day Poses:

  • Standing Half Moon Pose - Reach your arms to the ceiling and interlace your fingers. Lean to the right for 10-15 seconds, then lean to the left for 10-15 seconds
  • Tree Pose - While standing, place your left foot onto your right leg at about thigh level, and balance there. Then do the same thing with your right foot on your left leg.
  • Standing Forward Fold - Standing, bend at the waist and reach toward the floor, then roll up one vertebrae at a time, until standing straight again.

Tip to Reduce Pain #2: What to Wear

A good pair of shoes can help reduce back and leg pain

A good pair of shoes is a life saver for anyone who is on their feet all day. Everyone has had the experience of wearing an uncomfortable shoes at a party or event where you are on your feet a lot, and how much that hurts at the end of the day. If you have the kind of job where standing for hours on end happens every day, you cannot afford to have an uncomfortable pair of shoes. Make sure to check with the recommendations of the shoes you buy as to how often they need to be replaced for maximum comfort and support.

Compression socks or compression hose can be very beneficial for those on their feet all day as well. These socks or hose prevent blood from pooling in the legs or feet, which can cause discomfort. They also reduce your risk of blood clots.

Tip to Reduce Pain #3: What to Stand On

An anti-fatigue mat can be helpful for those who stand on their feet all day.

Some jobs requiring standing all day also have people walking and moving, so there is not constant pressure on your back, legs, and feet. However, if you work in a factory, teach classes, or even cook on a kitchen line, you may stand in a very small space for long periods of time. In this case, it might be worth looking into getting an anti-fatigue mat or mats. These mats add cushion to concrete and other unforgiving floors. Less pressure on your back, knees, and feet will allow you to stand for longer without feeling pain and fatigue.

If you stand on your feet all day long to make a living, call our team of doctors at South Orange Chiropractic Center for more ideas on how to reduce the pain, and see how chiropractic care can benefit you.

6 Easy Exercises to Help Relieve Sciatica Pain

6 Easy Exercises to Help Relieve Sciatica Pain
Published Thursday, 01 February 2018

If you’ve ever experienced Sciatica Pain, you know it, though you may not have known what to call it at the time. Researchers estimate that 43 percent of the population will experience this pain at some point during their lives. Sciatica pain comes from the lower back, and travels down through the buttock into one or both legs. The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in the body, and therefore can produce serious pain down your entire body, even into your toes. You may experience pain in the form of tingling, numbness or weakness in your lower back, buttock, legs, and toes.

There are many different treatments for sciatica pain:

  • Pain medication
  • Steroid injections
  • Acupuncture
  • Chiropractic manipulation
  • Massage therapy

However, taking pain medication or having injections can disrupt your day to day life as well as your overall health. Thankfully, there are some easy exercises you can do regularly to help manage your pain.

Knees to Chest

For this exercise, lay down flat on your back, and slowly hug your knees to your chest for 30 seconds. Try repeating this three times in a row a couple of times a day.

9463da7e 1b13 499d 9de7 83e438445531 woman tattoos black yoga outfit hugging knees to chest

Modified Cobra Stretch

To do a cobra stretch, lie on your stomach with your legs together and extended, toes pointing. Rest your forearms and palms on the floor close to your body. Then push up from your palms to partially straighten your elbows, bringing your chest and stomach up off the floor. Hold this pose for five seconds before laying back down on the floor. Repeat this up to ten times.

Royalty Free Cobra Pose Pictures Images and Stock Photos iStock

Seated Spinal Twist

Sit up with your legs out in front of you on the floor. Bend your right leg and place your right foot on the outside of your left knee. Twist your body toward the right. Hold this for 15-30 seconds, and repeat on the opposite side.

13 Twister slide edit

Low Lunge

Step your right leg out in front of you and bend your knee to a 90 degree angle. Place your left knee on the ground. The top of your left foot should be flat against the ground. Lift your torso and put your hands on your right thigh. Make sure to keep your right knee from going over your toes, lifting your torso to feel the stretch in your hips. Keep this position for thirty seconds. Then switch to do the same thing with your left leg forward and bent with knee over ankle, and right leg behind you on the ground. To feel an extra stretch, raise your arms straight above your body, with your elbows close to your ears.


Pigeon Pose

This yoga pose is especially helpful for sciatica pain. Bring your right leg out in front of you, and left leg flat on the ground, like you would for a low lunge. Then take your right foot, calf, and knee to the ground. Your right foot should be next to your left arm. Slowly lay yourself down on your forearms, feeling the stretch in your right thigh. Hold here for 30 seconds and repeat with the left leg in front and on the floor, and your right leg behind you.


Foam Roller- Hip Rotator

If you are feeling pain in your hips and buttock, implementing the use of a foam roller is a great way to relieve the sciatic pain. Sit on the foam roller with your knees bent, and feet flat on the floor. Put your right hand on the floor behind you, leaning back slightly. Next, cross your right leg over your left thigh. Roll back and forth, supporting yourself with your right hand and left foot. Do this for 30-60 seconds, and then repeat crossing your left leg over your right thigh.


The doctors at South Orange Chiropractic Center can help you manage and relieve your sciatic nerve pain with regular chiropractic adjustments. Contact us today to get natural pain relief and start living a life of improved health and wellness.

[VIDEO] Chiropractic for Sports Performance

Published Thursday, 16 November 2017

Click here to watch this video on YouTube!

Video Transcript

Dr. Stephen Levine:

So, part of my background as a certified chiropractic sports physician, I spent years working with athletes. I worked up at Seton Hall University back in the '90's. We saw a lot of track and field people. Not just track and field, but most athletes would come in with a complaint saying that, "Doc, I'm getting these hamstring pulls, or a groin pull. But it's always on the same side. Why is that?" You can treat it at the training room, but if we're not getting to the cause of the problem, which might be maybe one hip's higher than the other, and if the hip's higher than the other, maybe it's compressing the nerve from the spine.

So, the nerve, which exits out of the lower back, will affect the function of the muscles. So, when we take an x-ray, we take an x-ray standing up, not lying down, because I want to see posturally what's going on, and if one hip comes up higher, it's compressing the nerves on one side. And these are the nerves that go into the quads, the hamstrings, the calves and that's why regardless of your sport. We're all that weekend athlete or competing, or just training on our own. Why is one side getting tighter? It might be this, or it might be the pelvis is rotated, and we can see that on film. We can measure the nerve function, and as a result we can come up with a solution.

Running for Your Body and Your Mind

Running for Your Body and Your Mind
Published Tuesday, 29 August 2017

There’s plenty of research and evidence that demonstrates the physical benefits of running. This exercise helps people stay fit, lose weight, and reduce their risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. A common myth states that running can hurt the knees, but even science has shown that the opposite is true! Running actually strengthens the bones and joints. A recent study out of B.Y.U. demonstrated that in participants with healthy knees, “a single half-hour of running changes the interior of the knee, reducing inflammation and lessening levels of a marker of arthritis”.

More Than Just a Runner’s High

While the physical benefits of this common exercise are clear, many don’t realize what great effects running can have on your mind. Any long-time runner will testify to experiencing a “runner’s high”, where the body receives a rush of hormones called endocannabinoids which make you feel good after a run. But there’s more that running can do for your mental health than this short-term high.

  • A 2012 study in the Journal of Adolescent Health showed that teenagers who ran for 30 minutes once a week for three weeks reported better sleep quality, mood, and concentration during the day.
  • More recently, neuroscience researchers have discovered new neurons are produced daily in animals’ brains, and that vigorous aerobic exercise, such as running, helped to double the amount of new neurons produced in the brains of mice.
  • These new brain cells appear primarily in the hippocampus, an area of the brain that is responsible for rational thinking and emotions. This reaction may explain why many people feel that running helps them to clear their heads, relieve stress and anxiety, and make important life decisions.
  • While these findings suggest that running could help increase new neuron production the people’s brains, the scientists also note the importance of keeping those brain cells alive through concentrated mental activity, such as meditation.
  • A study conducted by Rutgers University showed that mental and physical training, or MAP Training, which combines 30 minutes of meditation and 30 minutes of running or other aerobic exercise, helped to decrease self-reported depressive symptoms in groups with major depressive disorder.

Letting Your Mind Run Free…or Not!

Many think of running as a good way to daydream or lose yourself in your own thoughts. In Haruki Murakami’s memoir, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, writes, “I just run. I run in void. Or maybe I should put it the other way: I run in order to acquire a void.”

However, the time you spend running can also become a great opportunity to practice mindfulness. Mindful running can help you perform better by transforming negative, self-doubting thoughts into ones of positive determination. Also, by being mindful of your body after a run, noticing what aches and pains you have or knowing if you need to hydrate more, you’ll be able to recover faster from the exercise. There are some simple steps you can take to practice mindfulness during your run, including syncing up your stride and your breath, but if you need a little help, there are some mindfulness apps to get you started!

But whether you’re letting your thoughts wander into the void or counting breaths and steps, running is a great workout for your body and your mind. Put on those dusty sneakers today and move toward an overall healthier you!

Reducing Cancer Fatigue with Exercise and Therapy

New study shows that drugs are not as effective at treating CRF

Reducing Cancer Fatigue with Exercise and Therapy
Published Tuesday, 09 May 2017

One of the most common symptoms of cancer treatments is fatigue. Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy can feel exhausted and heavy, with little to no desire to join in everyday activities. This type of fatigue oftentimes cannot be cured by simply getting more sleep. A report by The JAMA Network released in early March revealed that non-drug treatments such as exercise or psychotherapy are more effective for reducing cancer-related-fatigue (CRF) than pharmaceutical solutions.

  • The JAMA Network’s report analyzed 113 individual studies monitoring over 11,500 unique participants, in order to determine which treatment – exercise, psychological, the combination of exercise and psychological, and pharmaceutical – normally recommended for CRF is most effective.
  • Exercise and psychological treatments, as well as the combination of the two, reduced fatigue by 26 to 30 percent during and after cancer treatment.
  • Pharmaceutical treatments were only seen to reduce fatigue by 9 percent.
  • The authors of the study urge doctors to prescribe exercise or psychological interventions as first-line treatments for CRF.
  • The main author of the study, Dr. Karen Mustian of the University of Rochester Medical Center, says that the exercise therapy doesn’t necessarily have to be intense or vigorous. Most of the studies analyzed included walking and resistance training exercises. Also, the psychological treatment does not only mean structured therapy appointments with a counselor, but can also include group sessions and actively practicing mindfulness.

This report demonstrates that pharmaceutical treatments should no longer be the go-to prescription for patients dealing with CRF. Physical activity and psychological therapy can often do more to help reduce this fatigue than drugs or caffeine, even if they do not always seem like the easiest solutions.

Dr. Mustian in an interview said, “While our knee-jerk reactions might be to retreat, and to rest, and for caretakers to be very protective…actually encouraging [cancer patients] to be more active, asking them to get up and go for a 10-minute walk and walking with them – those kinds of things can make some of the most drastic positive impacts in the entire experience that someone would have with cancer.”

Read more about the report and real life success stories here

Arthritis a Growing Pain for US Adults

CDC recommends physical activity and self-management education interventions

Arthritis a Growing Pain for US Adults
Published Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Arthritis is a painful and sometimes debilitating condition caused by inflammation of the joints. Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that over 54 million adults are suffering from doctor-diagnosed arthritis in the United States.  Almost half of those diagnosed also described some sort of activity limitations attributed to arthritis pain, a 20 percent increase from 2002.

CDC Report Highlights:

  • Approximately 50 percent of adults with heart disease and diabetes and 30 percent of adults with obesity were also diagnosed with arthritis. Arthritis pain can cause even more complications for patients dealing with such preexisting conditions.
  • Medical expenses, including hip and knee joint replacements, stemming from arthritis pain cost the nation about $81 billion annually.
  • Adults diagnosed with arthritis are often prescribed opioids to help deal with the pain; however, the CDC recommends physical activity which can help reduce pain and improve physical function by almost 40 percent.
  • The CDC also endorses self-management education interventions, which are programs aimed to improve patients’ confidence and teach them skills to manage their condition. These courses have been shown to reduce pain, fatigue, and depression by 10 to 20 percent, but only 11 percent of adults diagnosed with arthritis have ever reported taking them.
  • People were more likely to attend a self-management education program when their healthcare provider recommended one.

Arthritis seems to be a growing and expensive problem in the United States, one that is causing many adults to have trouble completing simple, everyday tasks. Due to the scarcity of patients participating in self-management education interventions or treatment plans which prioritize physical activity over opioids, the CDC report also calls for further research to encourage these types of strategies.

In a teleconference with reporters, the acting director of the CDC, Anne Schuchat, M.D., “called on healthcare providers to do more to encourage patients to slowly increase their physical activity – such as with a short walk or a lap in the pool – and to strive for a healthy weight to reduce pressure on joints.”

You can read the CDC’s full report here

Head Injuries and Sports

Soccer players may be "heading" for concussions

Soccer Heading for Concussion
Published Wednesday, 01 March 2017

One of the most popular sports in the world, soccer is often considered a rite of passage for today’s youth. It is also a sport known for a high rate of concussions in it players, according to a study published in 2007 by the Journal of Athletic Training. In 2013, researchers conducted the Einstein Soccer Study, tracking soccer players in order to determine if “heading” the ball intentionally contributed to concussion symptoms to the same degree as accidental impacts, such as player-to-player or goal post collisions.

  • During the study, 222 amateur adult soccer players (79% male) completed questionnaires over a two-week period. The questionnaires asked them about their practice and game schedules, any intentional or unintentional head impacts that may have occurred during those practices or games, and any concussion symptoms (headache pain, dizziness, confusion) they may have experienced.
  • Researchers found that players who intentionally headed the ball the most were three times more likely to experience concussion symptoms.
  • However, players who suffered two or more unintentional head collisions were six times more likely to report concussion symptoms as those who only suffered a single impact. This suggests that unintentional head collisions are more risky than intentional ones.
  • In an interview with Reuters Health, the lead author of the study, Dr. Michael Lipton stated that this study only shows the short-term effects of heading, and more research is needed to address the long-term consequences.
  • The study followed amateur adult athletes in the northeast United States, so it is still unknown if the results can be applied to teenagers and children as well.

The report, published on February 1, 2017 in Neurology, demonstrates that concussion symptoms do arise from intentional heading, though more severe symptoms of concussion did mainly occur due to accidental collisions with other players or goal posts. While this may cause concern in parents over their children heading the ball in youth leagues, Lipton stressed there is a need for more research to track the long-term brain changes associated with heading.

Speaking to the New York Times, Lipton said, “We don’t know how much is too much. It would be great to say ‘no heading,’ but we don’t have enough information to say that. Public health interventions have to be based on evidence.”

Read more about the Einstein Soccer Study here.

Yoga Alone Is Not Enough For Back Pain Relief

Discover the link between Yoga and the best methods to relieve back pain

Published Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Yoga For Back PainThe annoying back pain that keeps rearing its ugly head might have you reaching for the Tylenol or aspirin, or might leave you entertaining thoughts of more radical treatment methods like surgery or injections. Before you let your achy back call all the shots, consider these other approaches to pain relief FIRST. Because the pain you are experiencing is probably more within your control than you may believe.

Why Should You Look for Alternative Treatment Methods for Back Pain?

Given that back pain affects most Americans to some extent, leading to multiple medical visits, it is often overtreated. As a matter of fact, it seems that many American adults get addicted to one or more types of painkillers while trying anything that might reduce their discomfort. Moreover, those who are desperately seeking the best remedy for their lower back pain may also be exposed to a series of side-effects linked to their treatment plan, including the dissatisfying results of ineffective procedures, such as surgery or steroid injections, or stomach ulcers and bleeding caused by common anti-inflammatory medications.

What Works Best When It Comes To Alleviating Back Pain?

If you are a fervent supporter of the Movement Is Medicine system, then you are probably wondering if practicing yoga is enough to help you overcome persistent back pain. In some cases, you may need more than a few yoga lessons to reach your goal; it all depends on what’s causing the pain that is disrupting your balance and daily activities. For example, if your body is misaligned as a result of an injury, yoga may not manage to provide the most effective solution to your problem.

On the other hand, regardless of its underlying causes, back pain can be alleviated through a combination of natural remedies, including quality chiropractic care, stretching via the Egoscue Method, strength training, osteopathic manipulation, better stress management tactics, meditation, massage, and acupuncture. To begin with, you may want to schedule your first appointment with a chiropractor who could help you treat musculoskeletal pain through a series of gentle spinal adjustments. Stretching (especially Egoscue) contributes to a correct skeletal alignment and reestablishes your lost muscular balance, offering you a longer-lasting pain relief. Strength training leads to stronger core muscles, which play an important part in preventing injuries and reducing pain.

Believe it or not, even less conventional options, such as meditation, acupuncture, and massage, can lead to major signs of improvement, as long as they are associated with other key elements, such as chiropractic sessions and a moderate workout. For instance, meditation may act as a potent pain reliever, allowing people to decrease the intensity of their discomfort and gain more control over their mind and body. Through a relaxing massage session, you could release endorphins, stimulating your body to relax and relieve pain. At the end of the day, it is your duty to test all the pain-banishing factors listed above and recreate the combination that works best for your body. 

What are the Back Pain Benefits of Yoga?

A regular Yoga practice ensures better stress management and allows you to achieve a longer-lasting balance between body, mind, and spirit. Yoga enables you to achieve a state of serenity, banish daily problems and concerns, and focus on movements that put your muscles to work in ways that benefit your back. Finding significant pain relief is a complex process that usually involves a trial and error system; however, each yoga session will give you the chance to stay active, boost core muscle strength and increase your flexibility. Quite often, patients that practice yoga at least once a week feel better than the ones who receive physical therapy and medication to improve their physical condition and win the battle with chronic back pain. There are several specific poses that you should master to reduce the discomfort that you’re experiencing, including Bird Dog, Boat, Cow Face Pose and Forearm Plank. All poses will tone several parts of your body, promoting mobility, improving your mood and stimulating you to stay active. For instance, the Cow Face Pose can stretch out your buttocks, hips, upper back and shoulders, letting you work on different key areas to strengthen your body and develop stronger pain coping capabilities. 

Quite often, patients who practice yoga at least once a week feel better than those who utilize physical therapy and medication alone to relieve chronic back pain. A couple of Yoga poses to consider for stretching tight muscles and ligaments as well as for building balanced muscle strength, include: 

  • Bird Dog Pose- starting on your hands and knees (on all fours) extend one arm out straight in front of you, and the opposite leg out straight behind you. Repeat on the opposite side.
  • Boat Pose- balancing on your behind, create a 45-degree angle between your upper body and lower body and hold. At first, you may not be able to straighten your legs, and that is ok. 
  • Cow Face Pose- Sitting with legs crossed, one over the other, and arms linked behind the back. 
  • Forearm Plank- In a plank position on the floor, with your arms bent so your weight is resting on your forearms and your toes. 

All poses will tone several parts of your body, promoting mobility, improving your mood and stimulating you to stay active. Yoga, meditation, and regular chiropractic adjustments are a powerful combination for not only reducing the debilitating effects of chronic pain in the back but also for promoting flexibility and strength. This approach goes beyond just eliminating pain, to promoting an overall state of health and wellbeing. 


Sigma Instrument Methods

Osler Health

Osler Health at South Orange Chiropractic NJ

South Orange Rehab

logo sorw